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Intellect

UPDATE: Annual OcTUBAfest to blow into BYU Oct. 25-28

OcTUBAfest, an annual four-day festival of horn music, will take place in the Madsen Recital Hall Wednesday through Saturday, Oct. 25-28, at Brigham Young University.

Admission to all events is free.

The festival will begin with a student tuba and euphonium recital Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. With BYU School of Music faculty member Robin Hancock on piano, students will play selections such as “Rhapsody for Euphonium” by James Curnow, “Sleeping Tuba Waltz” by Tchaikovsky and “Stars and Stripes Forever” by John Philip Sousa.

Steve Call, a School of Music faculty member, accompanied by Hancock, will be featured at Thursday’s recital, which will take place at 7:30 p.m. The repertoire will include J. S. Bach’s “Air and Bouree,” John Golland’s Tuba Concerto, Op. 46 and “Czardas” by Vittorio Moni-Sheridan.

The Utah Premiere Brass, a 32-piece British-style brass band, will perform Friday at 7:30 p.m. Soloists will include David Brown on trumpet, Call on tuba and Will Kimball on trombone. The group will present “Padstow Lifeboat March” by Malcolm Arnold, “Prometheus Unbound” by Granville Bantock and “Them Basses” by Getty H. Huffine, among other pieces.

The festival will conclude with the Grand OcTUBAfest Concert Saturday at 7:30 p.m. The performance will include the talents of the BYU Tuba-Euphonium Ensemble and the Grand OcTUBAfest Ensemble. The Celluloid Tubas Show will also take part in the concert, performing such pieces as “Raiders of the Lost Ark” and “Star Wars: Send in the Clones” by John Williams.

For more information, contact Steve Call at (801) 422-6116.

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