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Intellect

University of Utah's "Elektra" to have one performance at BYU Sept. 25

The University of Utah's 36th Annual Classical Greek Theatre Festival will stage an adaptation of Euripides' tragedy "Elektra" Monday, Sept. 25, at 5 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

BYU will host a free pre-performance lecture at 4 p.m. in the concert hall.

Tickets are $10 or $7 with a BYU or student ID and can be purchased at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, by calling (801) 422-7664 or by visiting performances.byu.edu.

"Elektra" tells the story of King Agamemnon's children, Elektra and Orestes, and their pursuit to avenge their father's death. Unfortunately, the murderers are their mother, Klytemnestra, and her lover, the new king.

Euripides' version of the story casts Elektra and Orestes as anti-heroes in a world where the differences between right and wrong are often fuzzy. This performance will feature original music, sets and costumes with an "ethnic peasant" motif.

The Classical Greek Theatre Festival is the largest and longest-running festival of classical Greek theatre in the country. The annual event is designed to educate communities and campuses across the Southwest about classical Greek theatre.

The production team for "Elektra" includes director Hugh Hanson, producer Robert Nelson and dramaturg and producer James T. Svendsen.

For more information, contact the University of Utah Department of Theatre at (801) 581-6448.

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