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Intellect

Times posted for rebroadcast of Thomas S. Monson devotional

"This is your time. What will you do with it?" President Thomas S. Monson asked students in Tuesday's devotional. In response to his question, President Monson offered this piece of advice: The gate of history swings on small hinges, and so do people's lives.

With characteristic charm and many illustrating stories, President Monson went on to discuss "three gates which you alone can open [and] must pass through . . . if you are to be successful in . . . mortality."

The first gate, President Monson said, is the Gate of Preparation. After sufficient preparation comes the Gate of Performance.

Closely following performance, and perhaps most important, is the Gate of Service. Of this, President Monson taught, "We are on the Lord's errand; and when we are on the Lord's errand we are entitled to His help."

The devotional will be rebroadcast several times on KBYU and BYU Television. The schedule is found at byubroadcasting.org/devotionals/.

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