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Intellect

Three BYU faculty members receive university research grants

Three Brigham Young University faculty members have been honored with research grants that are the result of recent restructuring of several university faculty awards.

Under the reconfigured grant program, proposals are now solicited annually from faculty in the following four grant categories with their respective foci:

• The Eliza R. Snow Grant offers support in bringing LDS perspectives to the academic disciplines or in expressing LDS perspectives in creative work.

• The David O. McKay Grant offers support for improving teaching across all disciplines consistent with the aims of a BYU education.

• The John A. Widtsoe Grant offers support for innovative research or creative work that enhances the quality of life.

• The J. Reuben Clark Jr. Grant offers support for work that increases the influence of gospel principles in public life.

Aaron Jackson of Counseling Psychology and Special Education was given the Eliza R. Snow Grant for his project, “Reconciling the Principles of the Gospel with Psychotherapy Theory and Practice.” Riley Nelson of the biology faculty received a David O. McKay Grant for his work in “Active Biodiversity and Scientific Inquiry in Large Undergraduate Biology Courses.” Beth Luthy of the College of Nursing was given a John A. Widtsoe Grant for “Reduction of Parental Anxiety Regarding Childhood Immunizations.”

A panel of faculty members adjudicated the proposals received. No proposals were submitted for the J. Reuben Clark, Jr. Grant this year, and the three faculty members listed above were selected for grant funding in the remaining three categories.

For more information on the university awards and grants process, visit avp.byu.edu/awards/awards.html.

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