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Intellect

Teaching with technology topic of April 11 showcase

Recent graduates of the inaugural "Teaching and Learning with Technology Faculty Fellowship" will demonstrate how they have integrated technology into their teaching during a showcase on Friday, April 11, beginning at 11 a.m. in 3222 Wilkinson Student Center.

The fellows will present how technology helps them meet their objectives and their students' needs.

The fellowships and the showcase are sponsored by the Faculty Center, the Center for Instructional Design and the Harold B. Lee Library.

"We hope this showcase will further the discussion about effective technology uses on campus," said Greg Waddoups, a CID assistant director who organized the fellowship.

Last fall, 14 faculty representing almost every college on campus accepted the challenge to learn about and effectively integrate technology in their teaching as part of the fellowship.

During the Friday showcase, they will discuss with their colleagues what they learned and how they applied that knowledge in a panel discussion from 11 a.m. to noon and then demonstrate the projects from noon to 2 p.m.

Although the disciplines vary greatly, from law to chemical engineering, it became obvious during the fellowship that each of the faculty fellows faced similar challenges.

"I'm amazed how similar the basic problems are between our different disciplines," said Steven G. Wood, associate professor of chemistry.

Matt Christensen, an assistant professor of Chinese, put analogue recordings of radio news stories onto CDs for his students to practice their listening comprehension with different accents and voices.

The projects reflect a combination of faculty's creativity and planning through one-on-one consulting with instructional designers from the CID, training from Faculty Center experts, helpful tips from library personnel, useful ideas from the other fellows, and technology advice from specialists in CID's Instructional Media Center.

"Our goal is to develop faculty who can effectively integrate technology into their courses in ways that focus on improving student learning," said Stephen Jones, assistant to the academic vice president.

Attendees at the showcase can also meet instructional designers and learn how to take advantage of the variety of faculty resources at CID. They will also be given the first chance to register for the BlackBoard Spring/Summer Seminar hosted by CID.

From scanning images to redesigning an entire course, CID is committed to helping faculty discover what technologies are available and how to implement them effectively, said Waddoups.

Writer: Emily Baker, (801) 422-1269

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