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Intellect

Syrian textiles, women's status weave together for Jan. 15 BYU lecture

Cynthia Finlayson, assistant professor in the Brigham Young University Department of Anthropology will present a lecture at a Women’s Studies Colloquium titled “Women, Status and the Ethnographic Textiles of Syria” Thursday, Jan. 15, at noon in 4188 Joseph F. Smith Building.

Finlayson, co-director of the Azem Palace Project to research, display and conserve traditional women’s costumes from Syria, will discuss costume and headdress styles that have defined a woman’s status in the Near East since the Assyrian period.

She received her bachelor’s degree in secondary education with emphasis in social science and history from George Washington University, her master’s degree in archaeology and museum studies at the Smithsonian Institution at GWU and her doctorate in classical and ancient Near Eastern art history with a minor in Islamic art and architecture from the University of Iowa.

The Women's Studies Colloquium at BYU is a scholarly forum for discussion, intellectual development and collaboration among students, faculty and others interested in participating in an interdisciplinary community of Women's Studies scholars.

For more information, contact Carrie Scoresby at (801) 422-4605.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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