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Intellect

"Sounds to Astound" Nov. 26 and 30 at BYU to teach acoustics

BYU’s favorite acoustics show, Sounds to Astound, is really turning up the volume with  shows scheduled to run Monday, November 26 at 6:00pm, and Friday, November 30 at 7:00pm. The shows focus on the science of sound, with more than enough decibels for all ages and personalities.

The acoustic shows will be held in room C-215 of the Eyring Science Center (ESC) on the BYU campus. Attendees should arrive five to ten minutes early as a courtesy to the volunteer presenters. The shows are free, but reservations are required as seating is limited. To make a reservation, visit sounds.byu.edu.

Although sound is at the forefront of the program, the shows won’t lack in eye-catching visuals that really “resonate.” Flaming sound waves, exploding balloons and more are the norm with the Sounds to Astound team. The family-friendly shows will help attendees understand how sound works, and anyone willing to stick around after the show can take a free tour of BYU’s anechoic chamber.

If you can’t make the shows, tours of this unique anechoic chamber and the reverberation facilities can be requested for classes or other groups through the Sounds to Astound website, sounds.byu.edu.

For more information regarding Sounds to Astound or the acoustics program at BYU, please visit sounds.byu.edu, or email acoustics@physics.byu.edu with any questions or concerns.

Writer: Preston Wittwer

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