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Intellect

Shandong University representatives hosted by BYU College of Nursing

The Brigham Young University College of Nursing recently hosted professors and executives from Qilu Hospital of Shandong University in Shandong, China, giving them an opportunity to witness first-hand some of the laboratory training BYU nursing students receive.

In addition to observing student training, the guests’ visit to BYU included a panel of College of Nursing faculty members who discussed typical U. S. nursing roles and the preparation of nursing students at BYU.

During their two-week tour of the United States, the delegation visited several universities and hospitals to learn more about American nursing programs, explore opportunities for short-term student and faculty exchange programs and look into joint research possibilities.

Shandong University is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in China, with 45,000 full-time students and nearly 3,000 faculty members.

Writer: Rose Ann Jarrett

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