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Intellect

Second annual BYU Blast! promises fast-paced musical evening Nov. 1

The second annual BYU Blast! will feature a variety of Brigham Young University’s top performing ensembles on Thursday, Nov. 1, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

Tickets will be $15 or $10 with a BYU or student ID and can be purchased at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, by calling (801) 422-4322 or by visiting performances.byu.edu.

“BYU Blast! consists of BYU’s instrumental and vocal ensembles performing short, exciting works in quick succession,” said Jaren Hinckley, a professor in the BYU School of Music. “Just picture it: the curtain rises and the Cougar Band Drumline performs a breathtaking number. Then the lights go out on them and come up on the Men’s Chorus, and then Panoramic Steel rises from the orchestra pit, and this just goes on and on.”

The program also includes performances by Wind Symphony, Women’s Chorus, Jazz Legacy Dixieland Band, Vocal Point, the Philharmonic Orchestra, various faculty soloists and many other student and studio ensembles.

For more information, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348.

Writer: Aaron Searle

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