Skip to main content
Intellect

Science and religion subject of new BYU lecture series

Religion and science will connect during a new lecture series at Brigham Young University sponsored by a grant from the Hyrum B. Summerhays family.

Kimball Hansen, BYU professor emeritus of astronomy, will be the first speaker in the series, which begins on Friday, March 21, at 7 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium on the library's first level.

The lecture series, hosted by the Colleges of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and Religious Education, is meant to give students, faculty and staff an opportunity to think about the relationship between science and religion.

"This lecture series speaks to the mission of BYU," said J. Ward Moody, professor of physics and astronomy. "I think BYU students have a more natural ability and desire to make science and religion connect."

The lecture series will include a speaker every six months for the next three years.

Each lecture will be given at the time of the equinox, which occurs in the spring and fall when the day has exactly 12 hours of light and 12 hours of darkness.

"There is obvious astronomical-religious significance to the equinox," Moody said. "In the time of the spring equinox, we have Christ's birth, and in the time of the autumnal equinox, Joseph Smith received the plates that would become the Book of Mormon."

To commence the series, Hansen will speak about some of the connections he has made in the two disciplines.

"He's had extensive research published on science and religion," Moody said about Hansen.

For more information on the lecture series, contact J. Ward Moody at (801) 422-4347.

Writer: Liesel Enke

Kimball Hansen-m.jpg

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

As the U.S. obesity epidemic grows, new BYU study shows who is most likely to be part of it

June 23, 2022
BYU researchers found that more than half of American adults in a new study gained 5% or more body weight over a 10-year period. What’s more, more than a third of American adults gained 10% or more body weight and almost a fifth gained 20% or more body weight.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Bunches of Oats: BYU professors untangle oat's evolutionary history for Nature paper

June 13, 2022
For the first time, researchers have sequenced the entire genome of a modern oat, the Swedish variety “Sang.” BYU plant and wildlife sciences professors Jeff Maughan and Rick Jellen played an important role in the international project, sequencing the genomes of two of oat’s ancient progenitors to elucidate its evolutionary history. The group’s findings were recently published as the cover article in top science journal Nature.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU tapped as major lead in $360 million national water resources effort

June 07, 2022
This spring the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced a massive $360 million grant to fund a four-part initiative to conduct research on water resources nationwide. BYU has been tapped to lead one of the four pillars of this major effort over the next five years.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=