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Intellect

School of Music faculty composer plans recital Nov. 6

Brigham Young Univeristy’s School of Music will present associate professor and composer Neil Thornock in a concert Friday, Nov. 6, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall. The concert is free.

Thornock began his music studies at BYU. He later received a doctorate in composition from Indiana University in 2006. He then went on to be a visiting assistant professor at Southern Virginia University. He joined the BYU faculty during the 2007-08 academic year. He teaches courses in composition and theory.

His compositions have been featured in various venues and formats including NASA, SEAMUS, SCI, Imagine 2, Eccles Organ Concert Series and San Diego State University. Additionally, his music for carillon has garnered several international awards and has been regularly performed at congresses of the Guild of Carillonneurs of North America since 2001.

For more information regarding the performance, contact Neil Thornock at (801) 422-1482.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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