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Intellect

San Francisco quake remembered in online photo collection available from BYU

In commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the San Francisco earthquake, the Harold B. Library at Brigham Young University recently added the Edith Irvine Collection of photographs to its Online Collections.

After the San Francisco earthquake, photographer Edith Irvine managed to secretly capture photos of the city’s horrific scenes, even though government officials had imposed limits on photographic access to the city’s most disastrous sections.

The online collection consists of a digital gallery of photographs and manuscripts viewable through the library’s Web site. The site contains all of Irvine’s photographs, along with descriptions, library catalog information and an account of Irvine’s life and work. To access the online collection, visit library.byu.edu/dlib/irvine.

The library will also display Irvine’s photos as part of the Utah Western Photography exhibition May 15 through the end of August.

For more information about the library’s Online Collections and the exhibition, visit library.byu.edu/online.html or contact Special Collections at (801) 422-3514.

Writer: Mike Hooper

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