Skip to main content
Intellect

Rex E. Lee

Lee points to five areas that he considers highlights of his tenure as president:

(1) The regularizing of procedures that had been long understood but never formalized, specifically academic freedom and requirements for employment.

(2) Timely graduation. This is an effort to streamline a BYU education while maintaining its quality in order to help students graduate sooner and thereby allow more students to enroll. The endeavor has included negotiating transfer agreements with several junior colleges, revamping the general education program, reducing requirements in majors, providing special programs in mentoring and advisement for students, and other initiatives.

(3) Long-range planning. The Lee administration has been active in identifying and tackling strategic issues that will affect the university well into the 21st century. BYU is still conducting an extensive self-study.

(4) A capital campaign. The university announced April 4, 1996, a major fund-raising effort. Planning for this campaign to raise nearly $250 million began during Lee's tenure.

(5) Construction on campus. BYU is in the midst of its most intense building period since that Wilkinson era in the 1960s. The Museum of Art was completed in 1993. The Benson Science Building was dedicated in October, 1995. There were major library additions at the law school and the Harold B. Lee Library. The Eyring Science Center underwent significant renovation. Student housing has been renovated and expanded, and more expansion is planned. A foreign language residential complex has been completed. The Wilkinson Center, which houses student activities, was rebuilt.

10Lee_Rex1989-1995-1.jpg

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Going cashless to prevent COVID-19 was useless, new BYU microbiology study finds

May 12, 2022
A new study published in PLOS ONE from BYU scientists finds that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is almost immediately nonviable if deposited on a cash banknote. The virus actually shows greater stability on plastic money cards, with the live virus still being detected 48 hours after initial deposition, but no viable virus was detected on either cash or card that was randomly sampled in the study.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

BYU student’s research solves an icy dwarf planet mystery

May 09, 2022
The dwarf planet Haumea has befuddled modern scientists for years. New BYU research details the planet's creation and solves one of astronomy's puzzles.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

When it comes to buying stuff, who do you trust to sell it: Government, nonprofits or for-profits? BYU study says...

April 26, 2022
Covid-19 tests were in short supply two months ago, but now testing options abound, from free tests mailed by the U.S. government to those available from pharmacies and nonprofit healthcare providers. All other factors being equal, is there an advantage to accessing a test through any one of these avenues?
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=