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Intellect

Research symposium Nov. 10 honors 50th year of Museum of Peoples, Cultures

In honor of the 50th anniversary of Brigham Young University’s Museum of Peoples and Cultures, the museum will sponsor a Research Symposium showcasing the history of archaeology and museums at BYU Thursday, Nov. 10 from 1 to 5 p.m. in B192 Joseph F. Smith Building.

The free symposium will highlight current anthropological scholarship among BYU students.  Each hour of the symposium will showcase a different aspect of archaeology and anthropology at BYU. 

The symposium’s keynote speaker is Benjamin Pykles, curator of historic sites for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints History Department. Pykles will present “The Negotiation of Cultural Identity at Iosepa: Utah’s Pacific Islander Mormon Settlement” at 3 p.m. 

The museum houses BYU’s collections of archaeological and anthropological artifacts from South America, Mesoamerica, the American Southwest, the Great Basin, Polynesia and other locations. It is located at 700 N. 100 East in Provo.

The symposium is open to the public.  For more information visit mpc.byu.edu or call 801.422.0020.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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