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Intellect

Remote sensing topic of BYU geography lecture Sept. 28

John Jensen of the University of South Carolina will address Brigham Young University faculty and students in a lecture on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 11 a.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

His address, “Remote Sensing of the Environment: Advancements and Challenges,” will draw from his extensive experience in applying remote sensing to environmental monitoring.

During his career Jensen has done significant work in agricultural, natural resources, urban and hazardous site monitoring. As the guiding force behind the NASA Applied Research Center at the University of South Carolina, he is a facilitator between the remote-sensing community and companies and organizations that would like to use remote-sensing technology.

Since his graduation from the BYU Department of Geography in 1972, Jensen has published 118 refereed journal articles and 59 chapters in books, and presented approximately 280 papers at national and international professional meetings. He will receive the NASA/U.S. Geological Survey William T. Pecora Award in November 2006, which recognizes outstanding contributions by individuals using remote sensing to understand the Earth.

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