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Intellect

Recital series to spotlight music of Clara Wieck Schumann Nov. 2

The Brigham Young University School of Music will present “Sophie’s Daughters V: The Music of Clara Wieck Schumann,” as part of a recital series featuring works by German-speaking female composers, on Thursday, Nov. 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Madsen Recital Hall.

Admission is free and the public is welcome.

The music will come from the Sophie Archive at BYU, a digital library containing more than 200 works created by German-speaking women between 1740 and 1923.

In 2002, Ruth Christensen, an assistant professor in vocal performance and pedagogy in the BYU School of Music, suggested adding music to the database. Each year since, public recitals have highlighted works from the collection, most of which have been neglected and rarely performed.

This year’s performance will feature faculty member Robin J. Hancock on piano and Michelle Stott James, Melanie Antuna and Erin Swenson as narrators. Pieces will include Schumann’s Romanze in B major, Op. 5, No. 3; “Das Veilchen”; “Liebst du um Schönheit,” Op. 12, No. 4 and “Mein Stern.”

For more information, contact Ruth Christensen at (801) 422-8949 or visit www.sophie.byu.edu/daughters/.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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