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Intellect

"Preserving the History of Latter-day Saints" subject of BYU conference Feb. 27

Brigham Young University will host “Preserving the History of Latter-day Saints,” the fourth annual Church History Symposium, Friday, Feb. 27, from 1 to 6 p.m. in the BYU Conference Center.

Admission is free, and the public is welcome to attend. The conference will feature lectures about historians of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, the Church Historian’s Office and the recording and publication of the Latter-day Saint past.

Elder Marlin K. Jensen, a member of the Quorum of the Seventy and Church Historian and Recorder, will be the keynote speaker. Assistant Church Historian and Recorder Richard E. Turley will also speak, along with scholars from the Joseph Smith Papers project, the Church History Department and BYU.

More than 20 speakers will lecture on preserving Church history, including Mark Ashurst-McGee, Jill Mulvay Derr, Carol Cornwall Madsen, Matthew Heiss, Jared Tamez and Reid L. Neilson.

The symposium is sponsored by BYU’s Religious Studies Center, the Historical Department of the Church and BYU’s Division of Continuing Education.

For more information, contact the Conferences and Workshops office at (801) 422-4853, or visit rsc.byu.edu/preservinghistory.php.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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