Skip to main content
Intellect

Population growth vs. available resources topic of BYU lecture Jan. 13

Dickson Despommier, professor of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, will speak to the Brigham Young University community at 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 13, in 446 Thomas L. Martin Building.

Sponsored by the BYU College of Biology and Agriculture, Despommier's lecture reflects views from his recently published essay, "Vertical Farm."

"Over the next 50 years, the human population is expected to rise to at least 8.6 billion," writes Despommier in his essay (http://www.verticalfarm.com/essay.htm) "That quantity of farmland is no longer available. Thus, alternative strategies for obtaining an abundant and varied food supply without encroachment into the few remaining functional ecosystems must be seriously entertained."

Despommier was named the 2003 winner of the American Medical Student Association's (AMSA) National Golden Apple for Teaching Excellence award and has authored the widely acclaimed book, "West Nile Story."

He received his bachelor's of science in 1962 from Fairleigh Dickinson University, his master's in 1964 from Columbia University and his doctorate degree in 1967 from the University of Notre Dame.

For information or questions, please contact Dr. James Jensen at (801) 422-7766, james_jensen@byu.edu.

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
February 25, 2020
The theme for the monthly Forums this year at BYU is “In search of democratic character," with "character" meaning the manners and virtues that enable communities and societies to function justly, according to BYU Academic Vice President Shane Reese.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 25, 2020
Researchers: interventions help cut-down on unhealthy game treats
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
February 10, 2020
For years now, 10,000 steps a day has become the gold standard for people trying to improve their health — and recent research shows some benefits can come from even just 7,500 steps. But if you’re trying to prevent weight gain, a new Brigham Young University study suggests no number of steps alone will do the trick.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=