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Intellect

Population growth vs. available resources topic of BYU lecture Jan. 13

Dickson Despommier, professor of the College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University, will speak to the Brigham Young University community at 11 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 13, in 446 Thomas L. Martin Building.

Sponsored by the BYU College of Biology and Agriculture, Despommier's lecture reflects views from his recently published essay, "Vertical Farm."

"Over the next 50 years, the human population is expected to rise to at least 8.6 billion," writes Despommier in his essay (http://www.verticalfarm.com/essay.htm) "That quantity of farmland is no longer available. Thus, alternative strategies for obtaining an abundant and varied food supply without encroachment into the few remaining functional ecosystems must be seriously entertained."

Despommier was named the 2003 winner of the American Medical Student Association's (AMSA) National Golden Apple for Teaching Excellence award and has authored the widely acclaimed book, "West Nile Story."

He received his bachelor's of science in 1962 from Fairleigh Dickinson University, his master's in 1964 from Columbia University and his doctorate degree in 1967 from the University of Notre Dame.

For information or questions, please contact Dr. James Jensen at (801) 422-7766, james_jensen@byu.edu.

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