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Intellect

Phil Allen to give annual Phi Kappa Phi lecture at BYU

Phil Allen of the Department of Plant and Animal Sciences at Brigham Young University will deliver the Phi Kappa Phi Distinguished Faculty Lecture at 11 a.m. Thursday, Nov. 18 in 3380 Wilkinson Student Center.

Allen received the award during BYU's Annual University Conference. His research has focused on ecology and physiology of seed germination under adverse environmental conditions. His current projects include: restoration of sagebrush ecosystems, simulation models for seed germination and novel soil testing procedures.

In addition to his research, Allen teaches undergraduate courses in landscape management as well as graduate courses in plant physiology. He also serves as advisor to the Horticulture Club and chair of the department faculty development and rank advancement committee.

Within the community, Allen is the volunteer director of the Rock Canyon ecological restoration. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from BYU in 1983 and 1985. Five years later in 1990, Allen received his doctoral degree from Minnesota State University.

For information or questions, please contact J. William Myrer at (801) 422-2690, bill_myrer@byu.edu.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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