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Intellect

Phi Kappa Phi Honored Faculty Lecture at BYU to be Nov. 16

“Folks and Lore: A Sampling of Folkloric Inquiry” by Jacqueline Thursby

The Annual Phi Kappa Phi Honored Faculty Lecture, “Folks and Lore: A Sampling of Folkloric Inquiry” by Jacqueline Thursby, will be given Thursday, Nov. 16 at 11 a.m. in 3380 Wilkinson Student Center at Brigham Young University.

Defining “folk” as any group of people sharing at least one common factor and “lore” as the expressive culture of that “folk,” Thursby said that everyone practices folklore without realizing what it is. She will instruct listeners about folklore, including “happenings in Salt Lake’s City Cemetery, European fairy tales and folk tales and Zora Neale Hurston’s collected lore from Florida about how women can keep gracious power over men.”

Thursby joined the BYU English faculty in 1996 to teach folklore and mythology and to help with the training of secondary English teachers. She attended Washington University in St. Louis, raised a family and later completed her bachelor’s degree at Idaho State Univesity, her master’s degree at Utah State University and a doctorate at Bowling Green State University in Ohio.

An eclectic cultural scholar, Thursby has written four books, several articles and is working on two more books: one about the influences of folklore and tradition on food and another about the influence of folklore on literature.

For more information, contact Lynn Callister at (801) 422-3227.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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