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Intellect

Peruvian Ambassador to the U.S. plans BYU address Oct. 23

His Excellency Felipe Ortiz de Zevallos, Peruvian Ambassador to the U.S., will present “Peru at the Global Stage” at an Ambassadorial Insights Lecture at Brigham Young University on Thursday, Oct. 23, at 11 a.m. in the Kennedy Center conference room (238 Herald R. Clark Building).

Zevallos has served as Peru’s ambassador since 2006, having previously served as president of Universidad del Pacífico, one of the most prestigious educational institutions on economics and business in Peru.

He is a guest columnist in magazines and an author of local and international papers. His publications include several books on Peru’s economy, such as “Peruvian Puzzle” (1989); “In the Shadow of the Debt” (co-author 1992); “Answers to the 90s” (co-author 1990); and “Half Way Through” (1992).

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu. For a complete listing of David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies events, visit kennedy.byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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