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Intellect

The Peking Acrobats bring breath-taking show to BYU Feb. 3-4

The Peking Acrobats of China will be performing at Brigham Young University Friday and Saturday, Feb. 3 and 4, at 7:30 p.m. with a matinee Feb. 4 at 2 p.m.

Tickets are $15-30, with $7 off with a BYU or student ID and $3 off for senior citizens or BYU alumni. Tickets are available at the Fine Arts Ticket Office, (801) 422-4322 or at byuarts.com/tickets.

Carefully selected from the finest acrobatic schools in China, the company includes gymnasts, jugglers, cyclists and tumblers who transform 2000-year-old athletic disciplines into a kaleidoscope of entertainment and wonder suitable for all ages.

The New York Post said “…this is a show that will probably twist you around in your seat…it’s amazing and exciting.”

Since their debut in 1986, The Peking Acrobats have redefined audience perceptions of Chinese acrobatics. They have played to sold-out houses and earned rave reviews during their 25 previous U.S. tours and have also toured internationally.

For more information, contact Ken Crossley at (801) 422-9348, ken_crossley@byu.edu, or visit www.iaipresentations.com/pa.php.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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