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Intellect

Paul B. Farnsworth to deliver BYU devotional address July 13

Paul B. Farnsworth, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry in the College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences at Brigham Young University, will be the devotional speaker Tuesday, July 13, at 11:05 a.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall.

The devotional will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels and online at byub.org. Rebroadcast and archive information will be available at byub.org/devotionals or speeches.byu.edu.

Farnsworth graduated from BYU in 1977 and received his Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. He did postdoctoral research at Indiana University and was also a visiting scientist at the Joint Research Center in Ispra, Italy. He has also been a visiting professor at the University of Utah.

Farnsworth conducts research in analytical spectroscopy, with an emphasis on the development of new analytical techniques and instrumentation for elemental analysis.

For more information, contact Paul Farnsworth at (801) 422-6502.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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