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Intellect

Paraguayan advocate for the poor plans March 5 BYU lecture

Founder and CEO of Fundacion Paraguaya Martin Burt will be speaking at Brigham Young University Friday, March 5, at 3 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

His lecture is titled “How to Prepare for a Career in Development.” It will be open to the public and is presented by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies.

Burt established Fundacion Paraguya 25 years ago to promote entrepreneurship among the world’s poor. He pioneered using microfinance, youth entrepreneurship and financial literacy methodologies to combat poverty in Paraguay.

Burt is also the co-founder of Teach a Man to Fish, a global network based in London, which promotes “education that pays for itself.” They partner with other organization to establish self-sufficient schools.

Burt was elected twice as president of the Paraguayan-American Chamber of Commerce, has served as vice minister of commerce and was elected mayor of Asunción.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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