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Intellect

Oppositional, defiant children topic of BYU workshop

Conferences and Workshops at Brigham Young University will sponsor a workshop Nov. 14-15 designed to assist educators, counselors and others who work with oppositional and defiant children as well as conduct-disordered children.

Workshop presenter James D. Sutton, a consulting psychologist and well-recognized author, specializes in training child service professionals on the campuses of major universities.

Sutton will introduce methods to bring harmony to relationships with the oppositional and defiant child. Included are ways to reduce wasted time, instigate long-term change and increase confidence and compliments in dealing effectively with this child.

He will also explain how to reduce frustration in working with the conduct-disordered child, avoid common pitfalls and achieve positive changes in the child.

The workshop is offered every other year at BYU. For more information or to register for the workshop, please access ocd.byu.edu or call (801) 378-4853.

Writer: Craig Kartchner

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