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Intellect

"Olympics in the Global Age" topic for David M. Kennedy Center lecture Feb. 8

This week's Café CSE at the Brigham Young University David M. Kennedy Center will focus on "The Olympics in the Global Age" with Corry Cropper, associate professor of French studies, and Richard Kimball, associate professor of history, Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 4 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

Cropper publishes on literature and on the representation of sports in France. His book 'Playing at Monarchy: Sport as Metaphor in 19-Century France' studies the way sports, including the Olympics, reflected cultural and class values in post-Revolution France. He is currently working on another project examining cheating, sports and identity in modern France.

Kimball’s research interests are in American sport history, especially gender and masculinity. His articles have appeared in the Journal of Sport History, Utah Historical Quarterly and Mid-America, among others. He is also the author of "Sports in Zion."  Kimball teaches American Heritage as well as an upper-division course on sport, society and American culture. He is currently working on a book that examines the deaths of American athletes and how society "uses" those deaths.

This lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive. For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

Writer: Lee Simons

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