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Intellect

Office of Academic Internships renamed Internship Office

Effective immediately, the name of the Office of Academic Internships will be changed to the Internship Office. This change will make it easier for faculty, staff, students and off-campus experience providers to locate this office in the university's information materials, including telephone and office listings.

The scope of responsibility for the Internship Office will continue to include all curriculum-based learning experiences that involve practical application with an experience provider, thus providing an effective way for the university to manage master agreements and provide ongoing assistance and training to faculty and department coordinators charged with the administration of related courses. The Internship Office will also continue to provide a full range of services for internships, including assessment and supplementary resources.

Master agreements are essential for legal indemnification and risk management in connection with the majority of learning experiences with off-campus providers. The Internship Office is responsible for the documentation and monitoring of master agreements for internships, clinical experiences, externships, field studies, student teaching, practicums, service learning and some IRB-approved student research. The faculty committee advising the Internship Office provides guidelines and definitions to help faculty determine when a master agreement is necessary.

During the 2003-04 academic year, 6,502 students were enrolled in courses involving learning partners/providers that required a master agreement. Of that number, 2,673 students completed an internship while 3,829 students completed a practicum, clinical experience, student teaching, field study, externship, capstone project, clerkship or other similar experience with an external partner or provider.

For more information, call ext. 2-3337.

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