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Intellect

NYTimes correspondent to discuss rise of China in BYU lecture Feb. 23

Elisabeth Bumiller, Washington correspondent reporter for The New York Times, will be speaking about “The Rise of China: What it Means to the United States,” Wednesday, Feb. 23, at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building at Brigham Young University.

Bumiller covers politics and policy in the Washington, D.C., with a focus on the Pentagon. From 2006 to 2007, she was a public policy scholar at the Woodrow Wilson International Center and a Transatlantic Fellow at the German Marshall Fund of the United States.

From 2001 to 2009, she wrote a weekly column, “White House Letter,” about the people and behind-the-scenes events of the presidency. She was the City Hall bureau chief from 1999 to 2001, when she covered Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani and his Senate race against Hillary Rodham Clinton and worked on the metropolitan staff in New York as one of the writers of the “Public Lives” column. Bumiller has also written for the New York Times Magazine and the newspaper’s culture and travel pages.

Previously, Bumiller worked for the Washington Post in Washington, New Delhi, Tokyo and New York. Her first job in journalism was in the Naples bureau of the Miami Herald. She authored “Condoleezza Rice: An American Life,” “May You Be the Mother of a Hundred Sons: A Journey among the Women of India” and “Secrets of Mariko: A Year in the Life of a Japanese Woman and Her Family.”

Bumiller graduated from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University and the Graduate School of Journalism at Columbia University.

The lecture is hosted by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. The lecture will be archived at kennedy.byu.edu/archive.  For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652 or lee_simons@byu.edu.

Writer: Mel Gardner

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