Skip to main content
Intellect

Nuclear disarmament topic for BYU lecturer April 2

Kenley Butler, executive officer and senior project manager at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, will be speaking at Brigham Young University Friday, April 2, at 2 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

His lecture will be titled, “A Farewell to Bombs: The Case for Nuclear Disarmament.” This lecture is sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. It will also be archived at kennedy.byu.edu.

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies attempts to combat the spread of mass-destructive weapons with training and analysis. Butler has written on proliferation threats in the former Soviet Union, on proliferation networks and on export controls.

Prior to joining the center, Butler spent two years as an international trade specialist with the U.S. Commercial Service, served with the first group of Peace Corps volunteers in Uzbekistan and conducted research on the privatization of Kazakhstan's telecommunications infrastructure at Almaty State University. Butler is a graduate of BYU with a degree in Russian and business.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
August 12, 2020
To date, Congress has authorized roughly $3 trillion in COVID-19 relief assistance— the largest relief package in history. With more COVID relief money on the way, a new study led by two Brigham Young University business professors finds these newly available funds led to a significant surge in health sector lobbying activity, especially within the pharmaceutical industry.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
August 05, 2020
Launched in January of 2016, the Cambodian Oral History Project works to collect and preserve the records of the Cambodian people.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
August 05, 2020
Because 60% of biology undergraduates nationwide are female, the life sciences have long been thought to enjoy more gender equity than other STEM fields. But a new BYU study challenges the notion that all is well for gender parity in biology classrooms.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=