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Intellect

Nuclear disarmament topic for BYU lecturer April 2

Kenley Butler, executive officer and senior project manager at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies, will be speaking at Brigham Young University Friday, April 2, at 2 p.m. in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

His lecture will be titled, “A Farewell to Bombs: The Case for Nuclear Disarmament.” This lecture is sponsored by the David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies. It will also be archived at kennedy.byu.edu.

The James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies attempts to combat the spread of mass-destructive weapons with training and analysis. Butler has written on proliferation threats in the former Soviet Union, on proliferation networks and on export controls.

Prior to joining the center, Butler spent two years as an international trade specialist with the U.S. Commercial Service, served with the first group of Peace Corps volunteers in Uzbekistan and conducted research on the privatization of Kazakhstan's telecommunications infrastructure at Almaty State University. Butler is a graduate of BYU with a degree in Russian and business.

For more information, contact Lee Simons at (801) 422-2652.

Writer: Brandon Garrett

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