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Intellect

North Creek archaeological site topic of BYU lecture Oct. 16

Joel C. Janetski, professor of anthropology at Brigham Young University, will present “The Archaeology of North Creek Shelter: 10,000 Years of Human History in Southern Utah” Thursday, Oct. 16, at 7:00 p.m. in room 309 at the Provo Library at Academy Square.

For the past five seasons, Janetski has led students from BYU and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas on an anthropology dig at North Creek Shelter, an area near the junction of North Creek and the Escalante River. The area has an on-and-off record of human occupancy spanning the last 10,000 years.

“Stone tools, tool-making debris, animal bone and cooking and storage features tell of the importance of hunting and tool production while living at North Creek Shelter,” Jatnetski said. “In addition to evidence of human activity, data from sediment and charcoal analysis reveals that the climate in Southern Utah during that distant past was wetter and cooler than today.”

Janetski’s research has been funded by the National Science Foundation, the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies and the BYU Department of Anthropology.

For more information, contact Joel Janetski at (801) 422-6111 or joel_janetski@byu.edu.

Writer: Brady Toone

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