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Intellect

New version of myBYU available

BYU students and employees now have access to an extensively tested update of myBYU. Advantages of this beta version include: 

  • improved mobile view
  • easier adding and moving of content and tabs
  • addition of 123 new and 18 upgraded portlets
  • larger selection of pre-built tabs with pre-populated content
  • ability to minimize individual portlets to save space
  • personalized site maps for faster access to content

Bookmarks and calendar items from the old version will transfer automatically, but user-customized layouts will not. Beta users will, however, be able to easily customize layouts. At present, only one theme is available in the beta version. Others will follow soon. 
While everyone is free to remain on the current version, the Office of IT encourages users to make the transition now; both versions will be in place until September 30 of this year at which time the older version will be retired.

To access the myBYU beta version, go to http://my-beta.byu.edu. We encourage you to bookmark this new version.

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