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Intellect

New Shanghai Circus to perform at BYU Feb. 2-3

In residence at Branson, Mo., for nearly ten years

The New Shanghai Circus, a contemporary interpretation enhanced by powerful and enchanting choreography, lighting, scenery and music, will perform in concert Tuesday and Wednesday, Feb. 2-3, at 7:30 p.m. in the de Jong Concert Hall at Brigham Young University.

Tickets prices range from $8 to $30 and can be purchased online at byuarts.com, by phone at (801) 422-4322 or in person at the Harris Fine Arts Center Ticket Office.

Founded in 1951, The New Shanghai Circus will be performing traditional Chinese cultural acrobatics including “Group Contortion,” one of the oldest recorded forms of acrobatics in China. This act challenges the performers’ strength and flexibility as they bend and twist to form living sculptures on the stage.

The Chinese acrobatic acts have their roots in everyday lives of the village peasants, farmers and craftsman of the Han Dynasty in China, more than 2000 years ago.

The touring show is a way of bringing the ancient arts to the world, said show producer Lizhi Zhao, who noted that The New Shanghai Circus has won more gold, silver and bronze medals in domestic and international competition than any other Chinese acrobatic company.

Although they do national tours in the U.S. every year, The New Shanghai Circus has been in Branson, Mo., for more than nine years and now considers this to be their second home.

The event is sponsored by the College of Fine Arts and Communications. For more information, please contact Ken Crossley at (801)-422-9348.

Writer: Ricardo Castro

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