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Intellect

New director for BYU Counseling and Career Center

Student Life Vice President Janet S. Scharman has announced the appointment of M. Kirk Dougher, clinical professor of counseling psychology, as director of the Counseling and Career Center at Brigham Young University.

Dougher replaces interim director James M. Macarthur, who has served for one year. Macarthur will now resume his faculty position in the Counseling and Career Center.

“After a broad search, we felt very fortunate that the candidate who emerged as the most qualified was one of our own,” Scharman said. “We are excited that he can hit the ground running because he is familiar with the Counseling Center and has broad support.”

Dougher has been a full-time BYU employee for ten years as an associate clinical professor. He is a member of the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy as well as the American Psychological Association. He received his doctoral degree in clinical psychology from the University of Nevada.

For more information, contact Georgia Rasmussen at (801) 422-2387.

Writer: Angela Fischer

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