Skip to main content
Intellect

New BYU program allows baccalaureate graduates to certify in special education

18-month programs will certify, license graduates of accredited institutions

The Department of Counseling Psychology and Special Education at Brigham Young University has developed a program to allow baccalaureate graduates of any accredited university to certify to teach special education.

Due to the shortage of special education teachers, local school districts came to the David O. McKay School of Education asking for a program to allow current teachers to receive a licensure to teach special education. The McKay School of Education and Utah State Office of Education approved an 18-month program that certifies and licenses participants to teach special education.

Local school districts are in need of a local licensure program because only a few schools even offer a licensure program and they are located in northern and southern Utah.

Those who participate in the program are admitted to the licensure program, but not to BYU.

"The program focuses on the preparation of competent and moral educators who understand and respond to the needs of diverse students with disabilities and their families, with an emphasis on problem solving in collaborative relationships with educational professionals and paraprofessionals," said Katie Sampson, admissions chair for the program.

The program is based on theory and practice. Courses teach ways to assess students, plan instruction using appropriate curriculum, use appropriate behavior management strategies and engage in collaborative problem solving with school and family systems.

Classes for the program begin after 4 p.m. in order to allow those who work full-time to attend classes. The program is geared toward those who already work full-time or who are interested in a different career.

"We really look for people who have had an interest in special education," Sampson said. "Licensure participants have success because they know that is what they want to do."

Applicants are accepted into the program for fall semester and receive their licensure at the end of the next fall semester. For an application visit www.byu.edu/cse/licensureapp.pdf or www.byu.edu/cse.

For more information contact Katie Sampson at (801) 422-1408.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

BYU engineers travel to the Arctic, develop innovative radar method to detect polar bears

May 25, 2022
BYU engineering students are testing radar to track polar bears aboveground. If successful, the team’s work would mark a significant step forward in scientists’ ability to track mother polar bears during winter, when they den and give birth to their cubs beneath dense snowpack. Locating and protecting bear dens is important for conservation efforts.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Forum: It is a dangerous business, going into the laboratory

May 24, 2022
Dr. Paul B. Savage, the recipient of the 2021 Karl G. Maeser Distinguished Faculty Lecturer Award and professor of chemistry and biochemistry, delivered the forum to campus on Tuesday. He discussed some of the adventures and experiences he has had as a professor and researcher, and the concept that Heavenly Father has a great academic adventure planned for all of us.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

Going cashless to prevent COVID-19 was useless, new BYU microbiology study finds

May 12, 2022
A new study published in PLOS ONE from BYU scientists finds that the SARS-CoV-2 virus is almost immediately nonviable if deposited on a cash banknote. The virus actually shows greater stability on plastic money cards, with the live virus still being detected 48 hours after initial deposition, but no viable virus was detected on either cash or card that was randomly sampled in the study.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=