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Intellect

Native American musician Bill Miller to give pair of lectures at BYU March 30

Recently received Grammy Award, produced 15 albums

Brigham Young University will host Bill Miller, one of the most accomplished Native American musicians in the country, for two lectures Thursday, March 30.

Sponsored by the History Department and the Charles Redd Center for Western Studies, Miller will discuss "The Role of Native American Music in Ancient and Modern Native American Culture" at 11 a.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

Sponsored by the Sociology Department, Miller will discuss "Racial Relations and Reconciliation" from 3-4:15 p.m. in C-215 Eyring Science Center.

Admission to both lectures is free. Non-students wishing to attend either lecture should RSVP by contacting Dave Kay at zamaniproject@yahoo.com.

Miller, who recently received a Grammy Award for his album "Cedar Dream Songs," has toured throughout the United States for the past 25 years and produced more than 15 albums. He has also toured with groups such as Pearl Jam, Tori Amos and the Bodeans.

During the lectures, he will perform a few pieces of his music to give participants a first-hand experience with popular contemporary Native American music.

For more information, contact Dave Kay at (801) 473-4253.

Writer: Brian Rust

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