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Intellect

National Science Foundation researcher at BYU lecture

Quentin D. Wheeler, director of the Division of Environmental Biology for the National Science Foundation, will speak Thursday, March 27, at 7 p.m. at Brigham Young University.

His speech, "The Last Generation-Science, Society and the Biodiversity Crisis," is part of the annual John Tanner Lectureship presented by the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum.

The lecture, which is free of charge, will take place in the Tanner auditorium in the museum. A reception will precede the lecture at 6:30 p.m.

The museum will hold its annual "Nature's Art Show" Thursday (March 20) through May 2. This show features various sculptures, paintings and drawings of scenes of nature that have been submitted by both local and statewide participants. An opening reception will be held on March 20 at 7 p.m., at which the winning pieces will be announced.

Wheeler is a professor in the Department of Entomology at Cornell University. He received a doctorate from The Ohio State University in 1980.

His research interests focus on beetle taxonomy and morphology, fungus-insect associations, systematic theory, and the role of taxonomy in biodiversity study and conservation.

Wheeler has been employed in many museum positions, including a research associate post for the both the American Museum of Natural History and the National Museum of Natural History.

The John Tanner Lectureship features speakers from across the nation selected because of their efforts and expertise in natural history and human issues. The lecture is named for John Tanner, an influential 19th century businessman in Utah who provided support to the Westward movement of the Mormon pioneers.

For more information on the lecture, contact the Monte L. Bean Life Science Museum at (801) 378-5051. If you have questions about the exhibit, contact Doug Cox at (801) 378-6355.

Writer: Liesel Enke

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