Skip to main content
Intellect

National institute honors two BYU engineers as fellows

As of Jan. 1, 2008, Brigham Young University professors Michael Allen Jensen and David Long will become fellows of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the world’s leading professional association for the advancement of technology.

The grade of fellow is only conferred upon senior IEEE members who have made significant contributions to any of the organization’s fields of interest. The honor is a major achievement, as no more than one-tenth of the voting IEEE membership is granted fellowship in any given year.

Jensen and Long are both from BYU’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Jensen, who serves as department chair, received the advancement for his contributions to antennas and propagation for mobile devices and multi-antenna wireless communications systems.

Long, who directs the BYU Center for Remote Sensing, earned the fellowship for contributions to systems and applications of radar scatterometry and synthetic aperture radar in land and ice studies.

For more information, contact the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at (801) 422-4012.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

Related Articles

data-content-type="article"

Forum: Building the beloved community

October 26, 2021
Rev. Dr. Andrew Teal, a chaplain and Fellow at Pembroke College, delivered the forum address to campus on Tuesday. He spoke on building a beloved community — the theme for this year’s forums.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

New personal branding course educating BYU student-athletes on business in the time of NIL

October 26, 2021
Class teaches principles of success for life beyond college athletics
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"

A megafire induced over a century’s worth of erosion near Utah Lake — but there’s more to the story, say BYU scientists

October 22, 2021
In burned watersheds where the wildfire had consumed stabilizing vegetation and leaf litter, the rain had caused massive erosion. There was a 2,000-fold increase in sediment flux compared to unburned areas, creating a plume of ash and soil moving into Utah Lake that was visible from space.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=