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Intellect

Mid-life couples want more time with each other, national study finds

A nationwide study co-authored by a Brigham Young University professor found that what middle-aged couples most want to change about their marriage is the quantity and quality of their time together. The study, in the new issue of the Journal of Couple and Relationship Therapy, identifies six major themes mid-life couples want to change most in their relationship:

- Time (29 percent)

- Sex (15 percent)

- Communication/Conflict (14 percent)

- Miscellaneous (12 percent)

- Affection (11 percent)

- Nothing (11 percent)

- Money (8 percent)

"The value of this study is that it highlights relationship issues that provide unique challenges and opportunities among midlife couples," said Richard Miller, co-author and BYU professor of marriage and family therapy. "By understanding these challenges, clinicians will be able to better serve these couples."

Sherie Christensen, lead author and LDS Family Services clinician, said, "Better understanding of midlife marital relationships is crucial since the large baby-boom generation is currently at the middle-age stage of life."

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