Skip to main content
Intellect

Microbiology professor named board president of national laboratory accrediting agency

Shauna C. Anderson, a professor in the Department of Microbiology and Molecular Biology at Brigham Young University, was recently elected president of the board of directors for the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences.

Anderson, also the program director for Clinical Laboratory Science and director of the Biology Office at BYU, has been involved at various levels within NAACLS for many years and has taught many workshops on the accreditation process for the organization.

A recipient of BYU's Karl G. Maeser Excellence in Teaching Award, Anderson received her master of science degree in medical technology from the University of Utah, and her Ph.D in curriculum and instruction from the University of Washington. Hired by BYU in 1974, she was the first female faculty member in the Department of Microbiology.

For more information, contact Shauna C. Anderson at (801) 422-8757.

Writer: Angela Fischer

Related Articles
data-content-type="article"
October 29, 2020
In the tumult of 2020 America—the pandemic, the protests, the presidential election—BYU political scientists have spotted some good news.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
October 26, 2020
A new BYU study shows that contrary to many assumptions, military service has historically predicted greater civic participation — involvement in formal, purposeful social organizations — later in life.
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
data-content-type="article"
October 21, 2020
The cloth masks many are sporting these days offer some protection against COVID-19. However, they typically provide much less than the professional N95 masks used by healthcare workers. That may soon change. Recently, students from BYU’s College of Engineering teamed up with Nanos Foundation to develop a nanofiber membrane that can be sandwiched between the cloth pieces in a homemade mask, increasing efficacy up to 99%.


overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText= overrideTextAlignment=
overrideBackgroundColorOrImage= overrideTextColor= overrideTextAlignment= overrideCardHideSection=false overrideCardHideByline=false overrideCardHideDescription=false overridebuttonBgColor= overrideButtonText=