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Intellect

Michael D. Barnes new chair of BYU Department of Health Science

Dean Rodney J. Brown has appointed Michael D. Barnes as chair of the Department of Health Science in the Brigham Young University College of Life Sciences.

Barnes’ posting fills a vacancy created by the Sept. 11 appointment of former Chair Brad L. Neiger as an associate dean of the college.

For the past six years, Barnes has been director of BYU’s master of public health program, and last year he published five papers in scholarly journals and presented five papers at national conventions.

Barnes holds both a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree from BYU as well as a doctorate from Southern Illinois University in com¬munity health education. He taught at New Mexico State University as a pro¬fessor of public health prior to his appointment to the BYU faculty in 1997.

He has received many scholastic honors and is the author or co-author of more than 40 original peer-reviewed pub¬lications as well as numerous research proposals with funding totaling nearly $1 million.

For more information, contact Michael D. Barnes at (801) 422-3327.

Mike Barnes.jpg

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