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Intellect

Maori families used as a model in Cutler Lecture at BYU

A Brigham Young University faculty member will use the Maori culture as a model when she discusses "Rediscovering the Extended Family: Lessons Learned from the Polynesians" Thursday, Oct. 28, at 7 p.m. in 250 Kimball Tower.

The School of Family Life and the College of Family, Home and Social Sciences will present Elaine Walton, a professor of social work, as this year's Virginia F. Cutler October lecturer.

Walton has worked with Utah's Division of Child and Family Services to evaluate a model from the Maori culture, used to help solve cases of child abuse and neglect.

Her research at BYU focuses on developing and evaluating family strengthening programs in the child welfare system.

Walton received her bachelor's and master's degrees in social work from BYU. She received her doctorate from the University of Utah.

Cutler, a BYU alumna and former faculty member, left an endowment to the university making the lecture series possible. The support of her descendants has continued to make the series a successful way to provide a forum for discussion on family development topics.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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