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Intellect

Lost tribes of Israel, Biblical studies subjects of BYU lectures Oct. 10-11

K. Lawson Younger Jr., a professor of Old Testament, Semitic languages and ancient Near Eastern history at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, will visit Brigham Young University to speak at a Global Awareness Lecture on Wednesday, Oct. 10.

Younger will present his lecture, “Finding Some of the Lost Tribes of Israel,” at noon in 238 Herald R. Clark Building.

He will also deliver an Ancient Near Eastern Studies Lecture, titled "Biblical Studies and the Comparative Method," onThursday, Oct. 11, at 11 a.m., also in238 HRCB.

Younger is the author of “Ancient Conquest Accounts: A Study of Near Eastern and Biblical History Writing” and has edited many publications about the biblical world. He is a Rotary Foundation Fellow at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, a Tyndale House Fellow at Cambridge University and a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Fellow at Yale University.

Prior to joining the faculty at Trinity, Younger served as a professor of biblical studies at LeTourneau University and also taught at Sheffield University. He received a bachelor of theology cum laude from Florida Bible College, a Master of Theology with honors from Dallas Theological Seminary and a doctorate from Sheffield University.

This lecture will be archived online. For more information on David M. Kennedy Center events, see the calendar online at kennedy.byu.edu.

Writer: Marissa Ballantyne

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