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Intellect

Living Legends to present authentic colors, sounds in March 22 concert

Brigham Young University’s Living Legends will perform a celebration of Latin American, Native American and Polynesian song and dance in a concert at BYU’s de Jong Concert Hall Thursday, March 22, at 7:30 p.m.

Tickets at $12 with $4 off with a BYU or student ID are available through the Fine Arts Ticket Office, (801) 378-4322 or at byuarts.com/tickets.

Living Legends combines a dynamic repertoire of Native American choreography with the color and vitality of Polynesian and Latin American dance styles. Performed by talented descendants of the cultures portrayed, Living Legends weaves together traditional and contemporary music and is a tribute to the ancient cultures of the Americas and the Pacific.

The “Seasons” program will include a kaleidoscope of culture, with dances and songs from North America, Mexico, Ecuador, Hawaii, Guatemala, Samoa, Paraguay, Tahiti, Argentina, Bolivia, Fiji, New Zealand and Tonga.

“It is a moving experience to work with these performers because I see the sincere respect they each hold for one another’s ancestry as well as their own,” said artistic director Janelle Christensen.

Living Legends originates in the School of Music.

For more information about Living Legends, contact Performing Arts Management at (810) 422-3576. For concert photos and a press kit, visit pam.byu.edu/similarpage.asp?title=Living%20Legends.

Writer: Melissa Connor

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