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Intellect

Lee Library's Suzanne Julian to be Feb. 11 BYU devotional speaker

Suzanne Julian of the Harold B. Lee Library at Brigham Young University will be the next speaker at the campus devotional Tuesday, Feb. 11, at 11:05 a.m. in the Marriott Center.

The devotional will be broadcast live on the BYU Broadcasting channels and online at byutv.org. Rebroadcast information can be found through byutv.org/schedule. Archived devotionals are available at speeches.byu.edu.

Julian is the Library Instruction Coordinator in the Lee Library where spends much of her time teaching research skills to first-year writing students. She also teaches a student development class on advanced reading strategies to help students deal with the massive amount of textbook reading they have for their classes.

Professionally she has worked in public and academic libraries as a librarian and as a trainer for a computer software company for the past 27 years.

Julian earned a bachelor’s degree in English and a master’s degree in library science from BYU. She then received a master’s degree in education from Utah State University.

For more information, contact Suzanne Julian, (801) 422-2813, suzanne_julian@byu.edu.

Writer: Brett Lee

Julian.jpg

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