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Intellect

Lee Library helps safeguard student computers

Following several recent property thefts among students on campus, the Harold B. Lee Library has taken measures to prevent thefts of personal computers.

In addition to electrical outlets for laptops, the study tables in the library contain brackets for securing laptop computers with cable and lock devices.

Julie Berry, a computer merchandiser at Cougar Computer in the BYU Bookstore, says sales of computer locks have increased noticeably over the past couple of years. She also says most of the new computers she has seen now contain hookups for the locks.

“We’ve never had a computer taken from our store while we’ve had them locked with these devices,” she says about the demonstration models, all of which are locked to prevent shoplifting.

The locks look like those used for bicycles, and can be looped through the table’s bracket or around a table leg to discourage would-be thieves. Cougar Computer sells several brands of locks ranging in price between $19 and $25.

Kathy Johansen, serials department chair in the library’s Periodicals section, which is a popular study spot for students, says while she is aware of the tables’ security brackets, she hasn’t seen many students using them to safeguard their computers.

University and library officials are stepping up measures to inform students about keeping their personal items with them at all times, securing them if they leave or having someone else look after them while they’re gone.

While the latest surge in thefts has been termed a spike by University Police, it is still wise to lock a computer when leaving a study table--or even while sleeping at one.

Writer: Michael Hooper

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