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Intellect

Lee Library goes wireless to better serve campus community

The Harold B. Lee Library has enhanced its ability to serve BYU students and community members by installing wireless networks in the busier areas of the building.

Users with wireless-capable computers (and who have an identification and password set up) can now work without plugging into cable outlets, and with a battery can now operate their laptops totally free of cords and cables.

Currently, the periodicals and business management sections of the library have secure wireless connectivity, servicing around 100 computers simultaneously. More installations are planned for early 2004.

"Students have gradually been discovering the wireless access since the beginning of the semester," says Bill Lund, library information systems chair.

Corey Sakamoto, an MBA student from Hawaii, says he prefers the clear wireless reception and spacious atmosphere of the library to other places on campus. "While other buildings have wireless access, they aren't all on the same level," he says.

Lund explains that this difference in transmission may result from the location of wireless hubs or the high concentration of users.

"It's the best thing that's happened here," says Brent Skipper, a senior business major from Alabama about the library's wireless access. "It makes it easier to come to the library."

Wireless capability allows for more widespread computer use, and with the library's online research database visitors can locate materials and get on the Internet just about anywhere.

"If a lot of people aren't yet using it, they will be by Christmas," Skipper predicts.

For more information, contact Lund at ext. 2-4202.

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