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Intellect

Lectures discuss "Custom Made" exhibit at BYU Museum of Peoples and Cultures Nov. 18

The Museum of Peoples and Cultures at Brigham Young University presents lecturers Gerardo Gutierrez and Mannetta Braunstein on Thursday, Nov. 18 at 11 a.m. and 4 p.m. respectively to celebrate the "Custom Made: Artifacts as Cultural Expression" exhibit now on display.

Gutierrez will lecture on "Archeology and Ethnohistory of the Aztec Capitol and its Sacred Precinct" in 446 Martin Building. He has worked with the Center for Research and Advanced Studies in Social Anthropology.

Braunstein will discuss "Representations of Women in Labor: Ceramic Figurines from Pre-Columbian Mesoamerica" in C-295 Eyring Science Center. She is a consulting curator of pre-Columbian studies and has worked with the Barrick Museum at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.

A reception will follow the lectures from 5:30-7:30 p.m. The guest lecturers will be available at this time to discuss the exhibit with visitors. Refreshments will also be served. The museum is located at 700 N. 100 E. in Provo. Admssion is free.

For more information contact the Museum of Peoples and Cultures at (801) 422-0020.

Writer: Rebekah Hanson

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