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Intellect

Kennedy Center at BYU seeks teachers for universities in China

The David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies at Brigham Young University is seeking qualified couples and individuals to teach at a few highly respected universities in the People's Republic of China during the 2007-08 academic year.

More than 700 people have participated in the program since 1989, making friends and building goodwill for both BYU and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

Most teachers are hired to teach oral and written English, but there is a need for professionals with experience in the fields of linguistics, business, law, economics, science, culture and literature. Applicants with advanced degrees in any field are preferred.

All classes are taught in English, so formal teaching experience and Chinese language skills are not required for placement. Applicants must be active members of the Church of Jesus Christ, have university degrees, be in a secure financial situation, have excellent emotional and physical health, be age 69 or younger by March 1, 2007, and carry no childcare responsibilities.

Assignments are for 11 months beginning August 6, 2007 and include an intense two-week orientation at BYU. Chinese universities provide teachers with adequate housing, a small living stipend and airfare. Kennedy Center teacher nominees' names will be sent to the universities around March 1.

Applications for the 2007-08 academic year may be obtained by writing to China Teachers Program, David M. Kennedy Center for International Studies, Brigham Young University, 220 HRCB, Provo, Utah, 84604; (801) 422-5321; china-facilitators@byu.edu, or online at kennedy.byu.edu/partners/chinateachers. They must be completed and received by Thursday, Feb. 1.

Writer: Brooke Eddington

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