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Intellect

K. Newell Dayley named BYU associate academic vice president

Brigham Young University Academic Vice President Alan L. Wilkins has announced the appointment of K. Newell Dayley as the new associate academic vice president for undergraduate education.

Dayley replaces Noel B. Reynolds, who has just completed a five-year term as an associate academic vice president and has accepted an appointment as director of the BYU-based Institute for the Study and Preservation of Ancient Religious Texts.

"Noel is a wonderful colleague who has a deep understanding of BYU's mission," said Wilkins. "He has given excellent leadership to undergraduate education and we wish him well in his new assignment."

"Newell brings a wealth of experience to his new assignment. He has been an excellent dean in the College of Fine Arts and Communications and has served in a variety of other important positions," Wilkins added.

"Working with Alan Wilkins and the rest of his staff these five years has been a wonderful experience for me," Reynolds said. "I look forward to the exciting opportunities and challenges before the Institute and look forward to serving there."

Dayley is a professor of music, chair of the board of directors of BYU's Barlow Endowment for Music Composition, and a member of the board of directors of the Utah Arts Council.

He joined the BYU faculty in 1968, where he has taught trumpet, music theory, orchestration, film scoring and music business. Dayley was also the founder and director of the award-winning jazz ensemble, Synthesis.

Dayley has served in a number of administrative assignments, including chair of the Department of Music, associate dean of the College of Fine Arts and Communications, and associate dean of General Education and Honors. He has received many awards and commendations for his work as a composer, teacher and arts administrator.

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