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Intellect

Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible will be lecture topic Oct. 26 at BYU

Kent Jackson, a Brigham Young University professor of ancient scripture, will discuss recent findings from a study of the Joseph Smith Translation of the Bible during a "House of Learning" lecture on Thursday, Oct. 26, at 2 p.m. in the Harold B. Lee Library auditorium.

Admission is free and the public is welcome.

Jackson worked as part of a team that reproduced, in print, the handwritten version of the translation in 2004. Among the discoveries the team made were numerous phrases that had been omitted from the translation after Joseph Smith’s time because of the odd wording.

Jackson worked on the manuscript for six years and calls being a latter-day scribe to Joseph Smith one of the high points of his life.

“We feel honored to be in their company,” he said, “serving as the prophet’s later shift of assistants to continue in making available to the Latter-day Saints this great work of revelation.”

For more information, contact Emily Barr at (801) 422-1848. For a complete schedule of library lectures, visit lib.byu.edu/exhibits.php.

Writer: Elizabeth Kasper

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